AARDVARK FAQS

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Travel into Southern Africa requires a few basic health considerations prior to travel, including mandatory vaccinations. It is always advisable to check with your doctor or a travel clinic well before travel to ensure that you are meeting health requirements, e.g. yellow fever vaccination, malaria tablets, etc.

Herewith a few basic health guidelines to consider before you travel:

Malaria

As some Southern and Eastern African destinations are still considered malaria areas, it is advisable to take preventative steps if you are planning to travel to any of the affected areas. While preventative care is available through prophylactics, it is important to keep in mind that an individual can still contract the disease despite taking the medication. This is especially true in areas where a resistance to chloroquine has been reported.

As a general rule of thumb, the A, B, C, D of malaria is a simple mnemonic in preventative care:

A: Awareness

Malaria is transmitted by the bite of an infected female Anopheles mosquito and causes fever, chills, headache, muscle aches and a general ill feeling.

B: Bite prevention

Travellers should take protective measures to reduce contact with mosquitoes between dusk and dawn when Anopheles mosquitoes feed. Use insect repellents with up to 50% DEET, wear long sleeves, and sleep under mosquito nets and ceiling fans. Vital Protection®, a human friendly insecticide, can safeguard the user from mosquito bites.

C: Chemoprophylaxis

Travellers are urged consult their GP or travel doctor before departure to discuss appropriate chemoprophylaxis in the form of oral antimalarial tablets. Pregnant women and children have a higher risk of contracting malaria, so it is recommended that they do not enter a malaria area.

D: Drug treatment

Travellers who experience symptoms of malaria should present promptly on return if illness is suspected.

Early diagnosis of malaria by means of a blood test is essential to prevent complications. If caught early malaria can be treated with oral tablets, but severe cases may need to be hospitalized for intravenous therapy

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Stay hydrated, especially during the warmer months as temperatures can often exceed 40 degrees Celsius. As a general rule, you should aim to drink at least two to three litres of water per day.

Also keep in mind that the water quality differs from one destination to the next and may in some instances not be fit for human consumption. Always ensure that you have a sufficient supply of bottled or boiled water with you from any given departure point.

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Common in large bodies of still-standing water, Bilharzia is mostly prevalent in the southern half of Africa. As a rule, do not swim or allow for any skin contact at any such large water masses unless your tour guide advises you differently.

However, in the unlikely event of the disease being contracted, it can be easily diagnosed through a blood test and easily and effectively treated with biltracide.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”Yellow Fever” tab_id=”1512289779633-50809095-5109″][vc_column_text]Several African countries by law require travellers from any of the 43 countries where yellow fever has been diagnosed to present a valid certification of vaccination against the disease.

Travellers who cannot present such a certificate as proof of vaccination may be denied entry into the country, or alternatively will be vaccinated at an additional cost.

Yellow fever has been reported from 43 countries, mostly in Africa and Latin America. The list includes three SADC countries, namely Angola, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Tanzania.

Please consult with us if you are not certain whether or not the country you will be entering from is in fact on the list or if you have travelled and returned from other high-risk destinations in recent months.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][/vc_tta_accordion][vc_separator][vc_custom_heading text=”Travel insurance” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left”][vc_separator][vc_column_text]

Ensure that you have insured yourself and your belongings adequately prior to departure.  Please contact your broker for details and to discuss the different options available to you and exactly what they entail.  A basic insurance guideline to follow includes:

  • Health, injury and death Insurance

It is very important to have full medical, emergency evacuation and repatriation cover for the period of time you are away.

  • Cancellation and Curtailment

In the unfortunate event that may have to cancel or curtail your travel you may suffer the financial loss of what the entire trip has cost you if you do not have adequate insurance in place.

Product specific, cancellation and curtailment, may be covered by your insurance company. For added peace of mind you can also consider a top-up option to an existing policy to ensure that you are adequately insured for any eventuality.

  • Baggage and money Insurance

 It is advisable to take out insurance to cover you for damaged or lost baggage or cash, especially if you are carrying a large amount of cash or valuables such as laptops, tablets or any other electronic or camera equipment.

Aardvark cannot be held liable for any losses or damages incurred during your stay

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  • Which travel documents do I require

All visitors are required to carry a passport that is valid for six months beyond the intended length of stay. Nationals of certain countries do not require visas – this depends on the country you are visiting. It is advisable to check with the Consulate of the country you intend visiting for the latest visa and entry requirements.

We are also happy to assist you with information regarding the visa requirements for each destination visited.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator][vc_custom_heading text=”General FAQs” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left”][vc_separator][vc_column_text]

  • Which travel documents do I require

All visitors are required to carry a passport that is valid for six months beyond the intended length of stay. Nationals of certain countries do not require visas – this depends on the country When is the best time to travel?

While there isn’t really a ‘bad’ time to visit, the best time to travel will be dependent on the experience you are seeking and the destination you’re visiting.

We will carefully assess your individual travel needs and advise on the best options available to you.

With its diverse offering, Southern Africa’s interests range from spectacular wildlife and birdlife to botany, culture and natural phenomena such as the annual wildebeest migration in Kenya and the Serengeti or whale watching along the Cape coast.

As a rough guideline however, November to March tend to be the peak summer months, while April to May is regarded as autumn, winter from June to August and spring from September to November.

The ideal travel time really depends on the type of animal you wish to see or the activity you would like to participate in.

Certain reserves have good game viewing all year round but others will have particularly good sightings at different times of the year.

There is a general consensus that the autumn and winter months are the best times to go on safari, as the grass is dry and vegetation sparse making game viewing easier and it is also the time when animals are ‘out’ looking for water and food.

  • What to pack

While temperatures tend to be mild in winter, evenings tend to be considerably cooler. Pack multiple layers of clothing to ensure you stay comfortable and warm on afternoon game drives and walks as early morning and late evening game drives can be very chilly – even in summer.

During the warmer months pack light, comfortable and cool clothing as well as a light jersey or jackets for the evening.

If you plan to participate in walking and hiking activities, pack comfortable walking shoes, preferably and ankle-length boots.

It also goes without saying that the standard safari gear must include a broad brim hat, sunscreen and mosquito repellent.

In areas where malaria is prevalent, summer is generally a riskier time to travel.

  • Internet availability

Most city hotels and some lodges will have Wi-Fi or an Internet connection available. However, do enquire about any possible costs you may incur in the event that your accommodation do not offer complimentary Internet services.

Also, do keep in mind that there might not be any connectivity in more remote areas.

  • Currency

Roughly work out any day-to-day expenses not included in the package then enquire whether or not credit card facilities are available for larger purchases.

Always try to keep small amounts local currency with you as some of the more remote areas may only deal in cash and may not have card facilities. Keep a fair amount in US$ if travelling anywhere outside of South Africa.y you are visiting. It is advisable to check with the Consulate of the country you intend visiting for the latest visa and entry requirements.

We are also happy to assist you with information regarding the visa requirements for each destination visited.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]